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Themed collection Biomaterials Science Lectureship Winners

7 items
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Engineering DNA scaffolds for delivery of anticancer therapeutics

DNA scaffolds with programmability in size, shape and surface chemistry have been engineered for the delivery of various anticancer therapeutics.

Graphical abstract: Engineering DNA scaffolds for delivery of anticancer therapeutics
From the themed collection: Biomaterials Science Lectureship Winners
Communication

MMP9-sensitive polymers mediate environmentally-responsive bivalirudin release and thrombin inhibition

Enzymatically-responsive bivalirudin polymers loaded in thermoresponsive hydrogels mediate localized therapeutic peptide delivery in spinal cord injuries. These materials respond to upregulated remodelling enzymes to release therapeutic peptide into injured tissue.

Graphical abstract: MMP9-sensitive polymers mediate environmentally-responsive bivalirudin release and thrombin inhibition
From the themed collection: Biomaterials Science Lectureship Winners
Paper

Iodine-131-labeled, transferrin-capped polypyrrole nanoparticles for tumor-targeted synergistic photothermal-radioisotope therapy

Tumor-targeting nanoparticles based on transferrin-capped polypyrrole are fabricated by a one-step approach for combination cancer therapy with a remarkable synergistic therapeutic effect.

Graphical abstract: Iodine-131-labeled, transferrin-capped polypyrrole nanoparticles for tumor-targeted synergistic photothermal-radioisotope therapy
From the themed collection: Biomaterials Science Lectureship Winners
Paper

Effects of the poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel crosslinking mechanism on protein release

Poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel crosslinking mechanism has a differential effect on controlling protein release.

Graphical abstract: Effects of the poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel crosslinking mechanism on protein release
From the themed collection: Biomaterials Science Lectureship Winners
Paper

Reducible, dibromomaleimide-linked polymers for gene delivery

Reducible, dibromomaleimide-linked polycations exhibit reduced cytotoxicity compared to their non-degradable analogs and can be site-specifically functionalized.

Graphical abstract: Reducible, dibromomaleimide-linked polymers for gene delivery
From the themed collection: Biomaterials Science Lectureship Winners
Paper

Controllably degradable β-sheet nanofibers and gels from self-assembling depsipeptides

Inserting an ester bond into self-assembling peptides generated controllably degradable nanofibers and hydrogels for 3D cell culture.

Graphical abstract: Controllably degradable β-sheet nanofibers and gels from self-assembling depsipeptides
From the themed collection: Biomaterials Science Lectureship Winners
Paper

Comparative study of guanidine-based and lysine-based brush copolymers for plasmid delivery

Guanidinylated HPMA-co-oligolysine copolymers exhibit higher transfection efficiency to cultured cells than analogous lysine-based polymers for nucleic acid delivery.

Graphical abstract: Comparative study of guanidine-based and lysine-based brush copolymers for plasmid delivery
From the themed collection: Biomaterials Science Lectureship Winners
7 items

About this collection

This collection highlights winners of the Biomaterials Science Lectureship. This annual award was established in 2014 to honour an early-stage career scientist who has made a significant contribution to the biomaterials field. 

The 2018 Biomaterials Science Lectureship was awarded to Zhen Gu (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University, USA). 

Prof. Zhen Gu received his B.S. degree in Chemistry and M.S. degree in Polymer Chemistry and Physics from Nanjing University. In 2010, he obtained Ph.D. at the University of California, Los Angeles, under the guidance of Prof. Yi Tang in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. He was a Postdoctoral Associate working with Profs. Robert Langer and Daniel Anderson at MIT and Harvard Medical School during 2010 to 2012.

Prof. Zhen Gu is the recipient of the Young Investigator Award of the Controlled Release Society (CRS, 2017), Sloan Research Fellowship (2016), Pathway Award of the American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2015) and Young Innovator Award in Cellular and Molecular Engineering of the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES, 2015). MIT Technology Review listed him in 2015 as one of the global top innovators under the age of 35 (TR35).

This collection features articles published in Biomaterials Science from Zhen Gu as well as the three previous lectureship winners: 

2017 - Zhuang Liu, Foochow University, China

2016 – Fan Yang, Stanford University, USA

2015 – Joel Collier, Duke University, USA

2014 – Suzie Pun, University of Washington, USA

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