Jump to main content
Jump to site search
PLANNED MAINTENANCE Close the message box

There will be scheduled maintenance work beginning on Saturday 15th June 2019 at 8:30 am through to Sunday 16th June 2019 at 11:30 pm (BST).

During this time our website may be temporarily affected. We apologise for any inconvenience this might cause and thank you for your patience.

Themed collection Nanolithography of biointerfaces

11 items
Accepted Manuscript - Paper

Biopolymer monolith for protein separation

From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Accepted Manuscript - Paper

Multivalent Binding of Concanavalin A on Variable-Density Mannoside Microarrays

From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Accepted Manuscript - Paper

Engineering of spectator glycocalyx structures to evaluate molecular interactions at crowded cellular boundaries.

From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Accepted Manuscript - Paper

Mimicking the endothelial glycocalyx through supramolecular presentation of hyaluronan on patterned surfaces

From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Accepted Manuscript - Paper

A ‘catch-and-release’ receptor for the cholera toxin

From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Accepted Manuscript - Paper

Probing the nanoscale organisation and multivalency of cell surface receptors: DNA origami nanoarrays for cellular studies with single-molecule control

From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Accepted Manuscript - Paper

High-throughput Enzyme Nanopatterning

From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Accepted Manuscript - Paper

Binary Polymer Brush Patterns from Facile Initiator-Stickiness for Cell Culturing

From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Accepted Manuscript - Paper

Poly(alkyl glycidyl ether) hydrogels for harnessing the bioactivity of engineered microbes

From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Accepted Manuscript - Paper

Magneto- and photo-responsive hydrogels by co-assembly of peptides, cyclodextrins and superparamagnetic nanoparticles

From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Accepted Manuscript - Paper

Charge-tuning of glycosaminoglycan-based hydrogels to program cytokine sequestration

From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
11 items

About this collection

We are delighted to share with you a selection of the papers which will be presented at our Faraday Discussion on Nanolithography of biointerfaces taking place in London, UK in July 2019. More information about the event may be found here: http://rsc.li/soft-lithography-fd2019. Additional articles will be added to the collection as they are published. The final versions of all the articles presented and a record of the live discussions will be published after the event.

In studying biological interfaces where carbohydrates are prevalent – such as the glycocalyx or extracellular matrix – scientists are only beginning to investigate how chemical composition, binding thermodynamics, and 3D structure work synergistically to control development, communication, and disease progression. Carbohydrate-binding is far less well understood than other types of biological interactions. The importance of reproducing the 3D structure of carbohydrate interfaces for understanding their physical and biological properties cannot be overstated.

Capturing the interfacial dynamics that drive the mechanical and biological properties of natural carbohydrate-based nanomaterials will require synergistic advances in 3D nanolithography, surface characterization, and organic and macromolecular chemistry at interfaces. However, many of the researchers working in this area come from disparate fields that rarely if ever communicate, including physical chemistry, surface chemistry, mechanical engineering, biology, and material science.

This Faraday Discussion aims to bring these communities together in a single symposium to create a new language for approaching the challenge of carbohydrate-based biointerfaces and will show how chemistry, particularly the combination of physical and organic chemistry, will continue to drive advances in the field, providing new approaches to understanding, and in turn, creating biomimetic materials with precisely controlled nanoscale structure in three dimensions.

Spotlight

Advertisements