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Themed collection Nanolithography of biointerfaces

20 items
Paper

UV-responsive cyclic peptide progelator bioinks

We describe the development of cyclic peptide bioinks that self-assemble into gels in response to UV activation.

Graphical abstract: UV-responsive cyclic peptide progelator bioinks
From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Paper

Nanolithography of biointerfaces

This article is based on the Concluding remarks made at the Faraday Discussion meeting on Nanolithography of Biointerfaces, held in London, UK, 3–5th July 2019.

Graphical abstract: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Paper

Factors contributing to variability of glycan microarray binding profiles

Glycan density and linker composition significantly influence binding on glycan microarrays.

Graphical abstract: Factors contributing to variability of glycan microarray binding profiles
From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Paper

Hierarchically patterned striped phases of polymerized lipids: toward controlled carbohydrate presentation at interfaces

Microcontact printing can be used to generate well-defined microscopic areas of striped phases of both single-chain and dual-chain amphiphiles.

Graphical abstract: Hierarchically patterned striped phases of polymerized lipids: toward controlled carbohydrate presentation at interfaces
From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Open Access Paper

Multivalent glycan arrays

In this introductory lecture we discuss the state-of-the-art glycan microarray technology, with emphasis on novel approaches to immobilize collections of glycans in a defined, multivalent manner.

Graphical abstract: Multivalent glycan arrays
From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Paper

Biopolymer monolith for protein purification

Porous glycopolymers, “glycomonoliths”, were prepared by radical polymerization based on polymerization-induced phase separation with an acrylamide derivative of α-mannose, acrylamide and cross-linker in order to investigate protein adsorption and separation.

Graphical abstract: Biopolymer monolith for protein purification
From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Paper

Multivalent binding of concanavalin A on variable-density mannoside microarrays

Variable density glycan microarrays were used to study the multivalent binding of lectins.

Graphical abstract: Multivalent binding of concanavalin A on variable-density mannoside microarrays
From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Paper

Engineering of spectator glycocalyx structures to evaluate molecular interactions at crowded cellular boundaries

Membrane engineering with bystander glycocalyx structures reveals altered protein–receptor association in crowded cell surface environments.

Graphical abstract: Engineering of spectator glycocalyx structures to evaluate molecular interactions at crowded cellular boundaries
From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Paper

Mimicking the endothelial glycocalyx through the supramolecular presentation of hyaluronan on patterned surfaces

Self-assembled monolayers of hyaluronan (HA)-binding peptide allow immobilization of HA for studying the function of the endothelial glycocalyx.

Graphical abstract: Mimicking the endothelial glycocalyx through the supramolecular presentation of hyaluronan on patterned surfaces
From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Paper

A ‘catch-and-release’ receptor for the cholera toxin

Thermoresponsive receptors for the recognition unit of the cholera toxin (CTB) can recognise the protein with nanomolar affinity. An increase in temperature can drastically reduce their avidity, enabling on-demand release of CTB.

Graphical abstract: A ‘catch-and-release’ receptor for the cholera toxin
From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Paper

Probing the nanoscale organisation and multivalency of cell surface receptors: DNA origami nanoarrays for cellular studies with single-molecule control

DNA origami nanoarrays with cell surface receptor ligands for cellular studies of human cutaneous melanoma cells and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

Graphical abstract: Probing the nanoscale organisation and multivalency of cell surface receptors: DNA origami nanoarrays for cellular studies with single-molecule control
From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Paper

High-throughput protein nanopatterning

We demonstrate a high resolution and high-throughput patterning method to generate protein nanopatterns with sub-10 nm resolution by using thermochemical scanning probe lithography.

Graphical abstract: High-throughput protein nanopatterning
From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Paper

Binary polymer brush patterns from facile initiator stickiness for cell culturing

A new initiator stickiness method is reported to fabricate binary polymer brush micropatterns, which are ideal platforms for studying cell behavior.

Graphical abstract: Binary polymer brush patterns from facile initiator stickiness for cell culturing
From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Paper

Poly(alkyl glycidyl ether) hydrogels for harnessing the bioactivity of engineered microbes

Herein, we describe a method to produce yeast-laden hydrogel inks for the direct-write 3D printing of cuboidal lattices for immobilized whole-cell catalysis.

Graphical abstract: Poly(alkyl glycidyl ether) hydrogels for harnessing the bioactivity of engineered microbes
From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Paper

Magneto- and photo-responsive hydrogels from the co-assembly of peptides, cyclodextrins, and superparamagnetic nanoparticles

A hydrogel with dual response to magnetic fields and light is obtained from the co-assembly of peptides, cyclodextrins, and superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

Graphical abstract: Magneto- and photo-responsive hydrogels from the co-assembly of peptides, cyclodextrins, and superparamagnetic nanoparticles
From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Paper

Charge-tuning of glycosaminoglycan-based hydrogels to program cytokine sequestration

Glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-based biohybrid hydrogels of varied GAG content and GAG sulfation pattern were prepared and applied to sequester cytokines.

Graphical abstract: Charge-tuning of glycosaminoglycan-based hydrogels to program cytokine sequestration
From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Discussion

Glycan interactions on glycocalyx mimetic surfaces: general discussion

From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Discussion

New directions in surface functionalization and characterization: general discussion

From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Discussion

Multidimensional micro- and nano-printing technologies: general discussion

From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
Discussion

Preparation of multivalent glycan micro- and nano-arrays: general discussion

From the themed collection: Nanolithography of biointerfaces
20 items

About this collection

We are delighted to share with you a selection of the papers which will be presented at our Faraday Discussion on Nanolithography of biointerfaces taking place in London, UK in July 2019. More information about the event may be found here: http://rsc.li/soft-lithography-fd2019. Additional articles will be added to the collection as they are published. The final versions of all the articles presented and a record of the live discussions will be published after the event.

In studying biological interfaces where carbohydrates are prevalent – such as the glycocalyx or extracellular matrix – scientists are only beginning to investigate how chemical composition, binding thermodynamics, and 3D structure work synergistically to control development, communication, and disease progression. Carbohydrate-binding is far less well understood than other types of biological interactions. The importance of reproducing the 3D structure of carbohydrate interfaces for understanding their physical and biological properties cannot be overstated.

Capturing the interfacial dynamics that drive the mechanical and biological properties of natural carbohydrate-based nanomaterials will require synergistic advances in 3D nanolithography, surface characterization, and organic and macromolecular chemistry at interfaces. However, many of the researchers working in this area come from disparate fields that rarely if ever communicate, including physical chemistry, surface chemistry, mechanical engineering, biology, and material science.

This Faraday Discussion aims to bring these communities together in a single symposium to create a new language for approaching the challenge of carbohydrate-based biointerfaces and will show how chemistry, particularly the combination of physical and organic chemistry, will continue to drive advances in the field, providing new approaches to understanding, and in turn, creating biomimetic materials with precisely controlled nanoscale structure in three dimensions.

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