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Themed collection Advances in Experimental and Regulatory Toxicology

11 items
Editorial

Appreciation of Iain Purchase and Cliff Elcombe

Accepted Manuscript - Review Article

Role of Xenobiotics in the Induction and Progression of Fatty Liver Disease

Review Article

The safety evaluation of food flavouring substances: the role of metabolic studies

The safety assessment of a flavour substance examines several factors, including metabolic and physiological disposition data.

Graphical abstract: The safety evaluation of food flavouring substances: the role of metabolic studies
Review Article

Human relevance of rodent liver tumour formation by constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activators

A large number of nongenotoxic chemicals have been shown to increase the incidence of liver tumours in rats and/or mice by a mode of action (MOA) involving activation of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR).

Graphical abstract: Human relevance of rodent liver tumour formation by constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activators
Review Article

Chromatin dynamics underlying latent responses to xenobiotics

Xenobiotic-induced perturbations of somatic tissue or germline epigenomes may underlie delayed-onset and long-lasting adverse effects.

Graphical abstract: Chromatin dynamics underlying latent responses to xenobiotics
Review Article

Goodbye to the bioassay

It is time to say goodbye to the standard two-year rodent bioassay.

Graphical abstract: Goodbye to the bioassay
Review Article

Collaboration and competition: ethics in toxicology

Toxicology has frequently been a focus of scientific and societal concern. It's time to examine practices such as peer review, resourcing, transparency and data sharing to ensure the field stays current, relevant and ethical.

Graphical abstract: Collaboration and competition: ethics in toxicology
Review Article

Case examples of an evaluation of the human relevance of the pyrethroids/pyrethrins-induced liver tumours in rodents based on the mode of action

The CAR-mediated MOA for liver tumorigenesis is of no carcinogenic risk for humans.

Graphical abstract: Case examples of an evaluation of the human relevance of the pyrethroids/pyrethrins-induced liver tumours in rodents based on the mode of action
Review Article

Skin and respiratory chemical allergy: confluence and divergence in a hybrid adverse outcome pathway

Sensitisation of the respiratory tract to chemicals resulting in respiratory allergy and allergic asthma is an important occupational health problem, and presents toxicologists with no shortage of challenges.

Graphical abstract: Skin and respiratory chemical allergy: confluence and divergence in a hybrid adverse outcome pathway
Review Article

The failure of rodent carcinogenesis as a model for Man

Better understanding of carcinogenesis in Man makes clear that the detection of cancers in long-term rodent studies adds little to other predictive information, more reliably and reproducibly obtained.

Graphical abstract: The failure of rodent carcinogenesis as a model for Man
Paper

Screening for human urinary bladder carcinogens: two-year bioassay is unnecessary

Screening for carcinogens in general, and for the urinary bladder specifically, traditionally involves a two-year bioassay in rodents, the results of which often do not have direct relevance to humans with respect to mode of action (MOA) and/or dose response.

Graphical abstract: Screening for human urinary bladder carcinogens: two-year bioassay is unnecessary
11 items

About this collection

This is a collection of papers consisting of invited contributions to honour the contributions made to toxicology by Professor Iain Purchase and Dr Cliff Elcombe. The British Toxicology Society (BTS) readily agreed with the guest editorial team that it would be appropriate to publish a special collection in their journal as a mark of respect and appreciation of the contribution of Iain Purchase and Cliff Elcombe made to the science of toxicology, primarily but not exclusively through their involvement with the Central Toxicology Laboratory (CTL). The contributors represent a range of scientific excellence, some having worked at CTL or had collaborated with scientists in CTL. Others are scientists whose success in solving toxicological problems represent the ambitions of Iain Purchase and Cliff Elcombe in their approach to addressing toxicological problems.  Guest Edited by Brian Lake, Lewis Smith and Sam Cohen.

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