Issue 19, 2021

A bioinspired, passive microfluidic lobe filtration system

Abstract

Size-based microfluidic filtration systems can be affected by clogging, which prevents their use in high-throughput and continuous applications. To address these concerns, we have developed two microfluidic lobe filters bioinspired by the filtration mechanism of two species of manta ray. These chips enable filtration of particles around 10–30 μm with precise control and high throughput by using two arrays of equally spaced filter lobes. For each filter design, we investigated multiple inlet flow rates and particle sizes to identify successful operational parameters. Filtration efficiency increases with fluid flow rate, suggesting that particle inertial effects play a key role in lobe filter separation. Microparticle filtration efficiencies up to 99% were obtainable with inlet flow rates of 20 mL min−1. Each filter design successfully increased microparticle concentrations by a factor of two or greater at different inlet flow rates ranging from 6–16 mL min−1. At higher inlet flow rates, ANSYS Fluent simulations of each device revealed a complex velocity profile that contains three local maxima and two inflection points. Ultimately, we show that distances from the lobe array to the closest local maxima and inflection point of the velocity profile can be used to successfully estimate lobe filtration efficiency at each operational flow rate.

Graphical abstract: A bioinspired, passive microfluidic lobe filtration system

Supplementary files

Article information

Article type
Paper
Submitted
23 May 2021
Accepted
05 Aug 2021
First published
11 Aug 2021

Lab Chip, 2021,21, 3762-3774

A bioinspired, passive microfluidic lobe filtration system

A. S. Clark and A. San-Miguel, Lab Chip, 2021, 21, 3762 DOI: 10.1039/D1LC00449B

To request permission to reproduce material from this article, please go to the Copyright Clearance Center request page.

If you are an author contributing to an RSC publication, you do not need to request permission provided correct acknowledgement is given.

If you are the author of this article, you do not need to request permission to reproduce figures and diagrams provided correct acknowledgement is given. If you want to reproduce the whole article in a third-party publication (excluding your thesis/dissertation for which permission is not required) please go to the Copyright Clearance Center request page.

Read more about how to correctly acknowledge RSC content.

Social activity

Spotlight

Advertisements