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Issue 2, 2020
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Shapeshifting molecules: the story so far and the shape of things to come

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Abstract

Shapeshifting molecules exhibit rapid constitutional dynamics while remaining stable, isolable molecules, making them promising artificial scaffolds from which to explore complex biological systems and create new functional materials. However, their structural complexity presents challenges for designing their syntheses and understanding their equilibria. This minireview showcases (1) recent applications of highly dynamic shapeshifting molecules in sensing and distinguishing complex small molecules and (2) detailed insights into the adaptation of tractable bistable systems to changes in their local environment. The current status of this field is summarised and its future prospects are discussed.

Graphical abstract: Shapeshifting molecules: the story so far and the shape of things to come

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Article information


Submitted
30 Oct 2019
Accepted
04 Dec 2019
First published
05 Dec 2019

This article is Open Access
All publication charges for this article have been paid for by the Royal Society of Chemistry

Chem. Sci., 2020,11, 324-332
Article type
Minireview

Shapeshifting molecules: the story so far and the shape of things to come

A. N. Bismillah, B. M. Chapin, B. A. Hussein and P. R. McGonigal, Chem. Sci., 2020, 11, 324
DOI: 10.1039/C9SC05482K

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