Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 27, 2016
Previous Article Next Article

Pressure-controlled formation of crystalline, Janus, and core–shell supraparticles

Author affiliations

Abstract

Binary mixtures of nanoparticles self-assemble in the confinement of evaporating oil droplets and form regular supraparticles. We demonstrate that moderate pressure differences on the order of 100 kPa change the particles’ self-assembly behavior. Crystalline superlattices, Janus particles, and core–shell particle arrangements form in the same dispersions when changing the working pressure or the surfactant that sets the Laplace pressure inside the droplets. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that pressure-dependent interparticle potentials affect the self-assembly route of the confined particles. Optical spectrometry, small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy are used to compare experiments and simulations and confirm that the onset of self-assembly depends on particle size and pressure. The overall formation mechanism reminds of the demixing of binary alloys with different phase diagrams.

Graphical abstract: Pressure-controlled formation of crystalline, Janus, and core–shell supraparticles

Back to tab navigation

Supplementary files

Publication details

The article was received on 07 Mar 2016, accepted on 18 Jun 2016 and first published on 20 Jun 2016


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C6NR01940D
Nanoscale, 2016,8, 13377-13384

  •   Request permissions

    Pressure-controlled formation of crystalline, Janus, and core–shell supraparticles

    T. Kister, M. Mravlak, T. Schilling and T. Kraus, Nanoscale, 2016, 8, 13377
    DOI: 10.1039/C6NR01940D

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements