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Issue 1, 2015
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Template-directed ligation on repetitive DNA sequences: a chemical method to probe the length of Huntington DNA

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Abstract

Several genomic disorders are caused by an excessive number of DNA triplet repeats. We developed a DNA-templated reaction in which product formation occurs only when the number of repeats exceeds a threshold indicative for the outbreak of Chorea Huntington. The combined use of native chemical PNA ligation and auxiliary DNA probes enabled reactions on templates obtained from human genomic DNA.

Graphical abstract: Template-directed ligation on repetitive DNA sequences: a chemical method to probe the length of Huntington DNA

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
02 Jul 2014
Accepted
16 Sep 2014
First published
16 Sep 2014

This article is Open Access
All publication charges for this article have been paid for by the Royal Society of Chemistry

Chem. Sci., 2015,6, 724-728
Article type
Edge Article
Author version available

Template-directed ligation on repetitive DNA sequences: a chemical method to probe the length of Huntington DNA

A. Kern and O. Seitz, Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 724
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC01974A

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