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Issue 24, 2014
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Microchip nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis of saturated fatty acids using a new fluorescent dye

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Abstract

We demonstrate nonaqueous labeling and separation of the full range of short to long saturated fatty acids (C2 to C30) for the first time on a microfluidic device. A new fluorescent dye, Pacific Blue hydrazide, labels the carboxylic acid in a two-step, one-pot reaction to enable detection via laser-induced fluorescence at 405 nm excitation. Limits of detection for C10 to C30 acids range from 0.9 to 5.7 μM. Fatty acids were successfully quantified in a sediment sample from the ‘Snake Pit’ hydrothermal system of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, demonstrating the potential of this method to help characterize microbial communities through targeted biomarker analysis. Such a technique could also be utilized to differentiate between abiotic and biotic compounds in the search for life beyond Earth.

Graphical abstract: Microchip nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis of saturated fatty acids using a new fluorescent dye

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Publication details

The article was received on 24 May 2014, accepted on 01 Jul 2014 and first published on 02 Jul 2014


Article type: Communication
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY01243G
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Anal. Methods, 2014,6, 9532-9535

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    Microchip nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis of saturated fatty acids using a new fluorescent dye

    M. L. Cable, A. M. Stockton, M. F. Mora, K. P. Hand and P. A. Willis, Anal. Methods, 2014, 6, 9532
    DOI: 10.1039/C4AY01243G

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