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Issue 3, 2006
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Self-organized nanofibers from a giant nanographene: effect of solvent and deposition method

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Abstract

We describe the synthesis of the to-date largest soluble nanographene molecule containing 132 carbons in its core and the Scanning Force Microscopy investigation on its self-organization into supramolecular fibers. This alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon can grow from solution on solid substrates into fibrils with a length of several micrometers and a cross section of about 16 nm. Making use of different solvents and deposition methods it was possible to achieve a control over the interplay between dewetting and intermolecular π–π stacking, promoting the formation of thermodynamically favoured regular fibrils on mica. On the other hand, under kinetically controlled film growth the formation of ordered supramolecular arrangements at surfaces was hampered. These fibril nanostructures may be useful in the future for the fabrication of molecular nanowires.

Graphical abstract: Self-organized nanofibers from a giant nanographene: effect of solvent and deposition method

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Publication details

The article was received on 26 Aug 2005, accepted on 10 Oct 2005 and first published on 02 Nov 2005


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/B512137J
Citation: J. Mater. Chem., 2006,16, 266-271
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    Self-organized nanofibers from a giant nanographene: effect of solvent and deposition method

    V. Palermo, S. Morelli, C. Simpson, K. Müllen and P. Samorì, J. Mater. Chem., 2006, 16, 266
    DOI: 10.1039/B512137J

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