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Issue 26, 2021, Issue in Progress
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Plant-based CO2 drawdown and storage as SiC

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Abstract

Since the 1950's the Earth's natural carbon cycle has not sufficiently sequestrated excess atmospheric CO2 contributed by human activities. CO2 levels rose above 400 ppm in 2013 and are forecasted to exceed 500 ppm by 2070, a level last experienced during the Paleogene period 25–65 MYA. While humanity benefits from the extraction and combustion of carbon from Earth's crust, we have overlooked the impact on global climate change. Here, we present a strategy to mine atmospheric carbon to mitigate CO2 emissions and create economically lucrative green products. We employ an artificial carbon cycle where agricultural plants capture CO2 and the carbon is transformed into silicon carbide (SiC), a valuable commercial material. By carefully quantifying the process we show that 14% of plant-sequestered carbon is stored as SiC and estimate the scale needed for this process to have a global impact.

Graphical abstract: Plant-based CO2 drawdown and storage as SiC

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Article information


Submitted
04 Feb 2021
Accepted
12 Apr 2021
First published
27 Apr 2021

This article is Open Access

RSC Adv., 2021,11, 15512-15518
Article type
Paper

Plant-based CO2 drawdown and storage as SiC

S. T. Thomas, Y. Shin, J. J. La Clair and J. P. Noel, RSC Adv., 2021, 11, 15512
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA00954K

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material and it is not used for commercial purposes.

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    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
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    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

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