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Issue 1, 2013
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Integration of multiple components in polystyrene-based microfluidic devices part II: cellular analysis

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Abstract

In Part II of this series describing the use of polystyrene (PS) devices for microfluidic-based cellular assays: various cellular types and detection strategies are employed to determine three fundamental assays often associated with cells. Specifically, using either integrated electrochemical sensing or optical measurements with a standard multi-well plate reader, cellular uptake, production, or release of important cellular analytes are determined on a PS-based device. One experiment involved the fluorescence measurement of nitric oxide (NO) produced within an endothelial cell line following stimulation with ATP. The result was a four-fold increase in NO production (as compared to a control), with this receptor-based mechanism of NO production verifying the maintenance of cell receptors following immobilization onto the PS substrate. The ability to monitor cellular uptake was also demonstrated by optical determination of Ca2+ into endothelial cells following stimulation with the Ca2+ ionophore A20317. The result was a significant increase (42%) in the calcium uptake in the presence of the ionophore, as compared to a control (17%) (p < 0.05). Finally, the release of catecholamines from a dopaminergic cell line (PC 12 cells) was electrochemically monitored, with the electrodes being embedded into the PS-based device. The PC 12 cells had better adherence on the PS devices, as compared to use of PDMS. Potassium-stimulation resulted in the release of 114 ± 11 μM catecholamines, a significant increase (p < 0.05) over the release from cells that had been exposed to an inhibitor (reserpine, 20 ± 2 μM of catecholamines). The ability to successfully measure multiple analytes, generated in different means from various cells under investigation, suggests that PS may be a useful material for microfluidic device fabrication, especially considering the enhanced cell adhesion to PS, its enhanced rigidity/amenability to automation, and its ability to enable a wider range of analytes to be investigated, even analytes with a high degree of hydrophobicity.

Graphical abstract: Integration of multiple components in polystyrene-based microfluidic devices part II: cellular analysis

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Publication details

The article was received on 20 Aug 2012, accepted on 16 Oct 2012 and first published on 19 Oct 2012


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C2AN36171J
Analyst, 2013,138, 137-143

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    Integration of multiple components in polystyrene-based microfluidic devices part II: cellular analysis

    K. B. Anderson, S. T. Halpin, A. S. Johnson, R. S. Martin and D. M. Spence, Analyst, 2013, 138, 137
    DOI: 10.1039/C2AN36171J

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