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Issue 2, 2011
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Resistive switching memory: observations with scanning probe microscopy

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Abstract

Recent advances in information technology require higher-speed and higher-density memory devices. In the past decade, resistance switching memory has emerged as a powerful alternative to existing charge-storage-based, non-volatile devices. Despite the extensive research, much of the underlying switching/conduction mechanism is still unknown and controversial. The versatile capability of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has extended the understanding of resistive switching significantly. This review summarizes the recent advances in understanding on the mechanism of resistive switching effects with particular focus on SPM based observations. In addition, the tip–sample interfacial effects and resulting possible artefacts during scanning probe measurements are discussed.

Graphical abstract: Resistive switching memory: observations with scanning probe microscopy

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Publication details

The article was received on 11 Aug 2010, accepted on 09 Oct 2010 and first published on 25 Nov 2010


Article type: Review Article
DOI: 10.1039/C0NR00580K
Citation: Nanoscale, 2011,3, 490-502
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    Resistive switching memory: observations with scanning probe microscopy

    M. H. Lee and C. S. Hwang, Nanoscale, 2011, 3, 490
    DOI: 10.1039/C0NR00580K

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