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Binding of Kinetically Inert Metal Ions to RNA: The Case of Platinum(II)

In this chapter several aspects of Pt(II) are highlighted that focus on the properties of Pt(II)-RNA adducts and the possibility that they influence RNA-based processes in cells. Cellular distribution of Pt(II) complexes results in significant platination of RNA, and localization studies find Pt(II) in the nucleus, nucleolus, and a distribution of other sites in cells. Treatment with Pt(II) compounds disrupts RNA-based processes including enzymatic processing, splicing, and translation, and this disruption may be indicative of structural changes to RNA or RNA-protein complexes. Several RNA-Pt(II) adducts have been characterized in vitro by biochemical and other methods. Evidence for Pt(II) binding in non-helical regions and for Pt(II) cross-linking of internal loops has been found. Although platinated sites have been identified, there currently exists very little in the way of detailed structural characterization of RNA-Pt(II) adducts. Some insight into the details of Pt(II) coordination to RNA, especially RNA helices, can be gained from DNA model systems. Many RNA structures, however, contain complex tertiary folds and common, purine-rich structural elements that present suitable Pt(II) nucleophiles in unique arrangements which may hold the potential for novel types of platinum-RNA adducts. Future research aimed at structural characterization of platinum-RNA adducts may provide further insights into platinum-nucleic acid binding motifs, and perhaps provide a rationale for the observed inhibition by Pt(II) complexes of splicing, translation, and enzymatic processing.

Publication details

Print publication date
06 Apr 2011
Copyright year
2011
Print ISBN
978-1-84973-094-5
PDF eISBN
978-1-84973-251-2

From the book series:
Metal Ions in Life Sciences