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Issue 6, 2021

Recent advances of group 14 dimetallenes and dimetallynes in bond activation and catalysis

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Abstract

Since the first heavy alkene analogues of germanium and tin were isolated in 1976, followed by West's disilene in 1981, the chemistry of stable group 14 dimetallenes and dimetallynes has advanced immensely. Recent developments in this field veered the focus from the isolation of novel bonding motifs to mimicking transition metals in their ability to activate small molecules and perform catalysis. The potential of these homonuclear multiply bonded compounds has been demonstrated numerous times in the activation of H2, NH3, CO2 and other small molecules. Hereby, the strong relationship between structure and reactivity warrants close attention towards rational ligand design. This minireview provides an overview on recent developments in regard to bond activation with group 14 dimetallenes and dimetallynes with the perspective of potential catalytic applications of these compounds.

Graphical abstract: Recent advances of group 14 dimetallenes and dimetallynes in bond activation and catalysis

Article information


Submitted
08 Jun 2020
Accepted
03 Aug 2020
First published
03 Aug 2020

This article is Open Access
All publication charges for this article have been paid for by the Royal Society of Chemistry

Chem. Sci., 2021,12, 2001-2015
Article type
Minireview

Recent advances of group 14 dimetallenes and dimetallynes in bond activation and catalysis

F. Hanusch, L. Groll and S. Inoue, Chem. Sci., 2021, 12, 2001 DOI: 10.1039/D0SC03192E

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