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Issue 1, 2021
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The chemical biology of coronavirus host–cell interactions

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Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is responsible for the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic that has led to a global economic disruption and collapse. With several ongoing efforts to develop vaccines and treatments for COVID-19, understanding the molecular interaction between the coronavirus, host cells, and the immune system is critical for effective therapeutic interventions. Greater insight into these mechanisms will require the contribution and combination of multiple scientific disciplines including the techniques and strategies that have been successfully deployed by chemical biology to tease apart complex biological pathways. We highlight in this review well-established strategies and methods to study coronavirus–host biophysical interactions and discuss the impact chemical biology will have on understanding these interactions at the molecular level.

Graphical abstract: The chemical biology of coronavirus host–cell interactions

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Article information


Submitted
04 Nov 2020
Accepted
06 Dec 2020
First published
23 Dec 2020

This article is Open Access

RSC Chem. Biol., 2021,2, 30-46
Article type
Review Article

The chemical biology of coronavirus host–cell interactions

S. Datta, E. C. Hett, K. A. Vora, D. J. Hazuda, R. C. Oslund, O. O. Fadeyi and A. Emili, RSC Chem. Biol., 2021, 2, 30
DOI: 10.1039/D0CB00197J

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