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Issue 14, 2021
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Stepwise collapse of a giant pore metal–organic framework

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Abstract

Defect engineering is a powerful tool that can be used to tailor the properties of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs). Here, we incorporate defects through ball milling to systematically vary the porosity of the giant pore MOF, MIL-100 (Fe). We show that milling leads to the breaking of metal–linker bonds, generating additional coordinatively unsaturated metal sites, and ultimately causes amorphisation. Pair distribution function analysis shows the hierarchical local structure is partially retained, even in the amorphised material. We find that solvents can be used to stabilise the MIL-100 (Fe) framework against collapse, which leads to a substantial retention of porosity over the non-stabilised material.

Graphical abstract: Stepwise collapse of a giant pore metal–organic framework

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
17 Mar 2021
Accepted
17 Mar 2021
First published
26 Mar 2021

This article is Open Access

Dalton Trans., 2021,50, 5011-5022
Article type
Paper

Stepwise collapse of a giant pore metal–organic framework

A. F. Sapnik, D. N. Johnstone, S. M. Collins, G. Divitini, A. M. Bumstead, C. W. Ashling, P. A. Chater, D. S. Keeble, T. Johnson, D. A. Keen and T. D. Bennett, Dalton Trans., 2021, 50, 5011
DOI: 10.1039/D1DT00881A

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