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Chemogenomics for drug discovery: clinical molecules from open access chemical probes

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Abstract

In recent years chemical probes have proved valuable tools for the validation of disease-modifying targets, facilitating investigation of target function, safety, and translation. Whilst probes and drugs often differ in their properties, there is a belief that chemical probes are useful for translational studies and can accelerate the drug discovery process by providing a starting point for small molecule drugs. This review seeks to describe clinical candidates that have been inspired by, or derived from, chemical probes, and the process behind their development. By focusing primarily on examples of probes developed by the Structural Genomics Consortium, we examine a variety of epigenetic modulators along with other classes of probe.

Graphical abstract: Chemogenomics for drug discovery: clinical molecules from open access chemical probes

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Article information


Submitted
27 Jan 2021
Accepted
25 Mar 2021
First published
26 Mar 2021

This article is Open Access

RSC Chem. Biol., 2021, Advance Article
Article type
Review Article

Chemogenomics for drug discovery: clinical molecules from open access chemical probes

R. B. A. Quinlan and P. E. Brennan, RSC Chem. Biol., 2021, Advance Article , DOI: 10.1039/D1CB00016K

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    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
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