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Issue 22, 2020
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Optimization of analytical assay performance of antibody-gated indicator-releasing mesoporous silica particles

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Abstract

Antibody-gated indicator delivery (gAID) systems based on mesoporous silica nano- and microparticle scaffolds are a promising class of materials for the sensitive chemical detection of small-molecule analytes in simple test formats such as lateral flow assays (LFAs) or microfluidic chips. Their architecture is reminiscent of drug delivery systems, only that reporter molecules instead of drugs are stored in the voids of a porous host particle. In addition, the pores are closed with macromolecular “caps” through a tailored “gatekeeping” recognition chemistry so that the caps are opened when an analyte has reacted with a “gatekeeper”. The subsequent uncapping leads to a release of a large number of indicator molecules, endowing the system with signal amplification features. Particular benefits of such systems are their modularity and adaptability. With the example of the immunochemical detection of type-I pyrethroids by fluorescent dye-releasing gAID systems, the influence of several tuning modes on the optimisation of such hybrid sensory materials is introduced here. In particular, different mesoporous silica supports (from nano- and microparticles to platelets and short fibres), different functionalisation routes and different loading sequences were assessed. The materials’ performances were evaluated by studying their temporal response behaviour and detection sensitivity, including the tightness of pore closure (through the amount of blank release in the absence of analyte) and the release kinetics. Our results indicate that the better the paratope-accommodating Fab region of the antibody “cap” fits into the host material's pore opening, the better the closing/opening mechanism can be controlled. Because such materials are well-suited for LFAs, performance assessment included a test-strip format besides conventional assays in suspension. In combination with dyes as indicators and smartphones for read-out, simple analytical tests for use by untrained personnel directly at a point-of-need such as an aeroplane cabin can be devised, allowing for sensitivities down to the μg kg−1 range in <5 min with case-required selectivities.

Graphical abstract: Optimization of analytical assay performance of antibody-gated indicator-releasing mesoporous silica particles

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
10 Feb 2020
Accepted
30 Apr 2020
First published
29 May 2020

This article is Open Access

J. Mater. Chem. B, 2020,8, 4950-4961
Article type
Paper

Optimization of analytical assay performance of antibody-gated indicator-releasing mesoporous silica particles

E. Costa, E. Climent, K. Gawlitza, W. Wan, M. G. Weller and K. Rurack, J. Mater. Chem. B, 2020, 8, 4950
DOI: 10.1039/D0TB00371A

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