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Near-infrared fluorescent molecular probes for imaging and diagnosis of nephro-urological diseases

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Abstract

Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging has improved imaging depth relative to conventional fluorescence imaging in the visible region, demonstrating great potential in both fundamental biomedical research and clinical practice. To improve the detection specificity, NIR fluorescence imaging probes have been under extensive development. This review summarizes the particular application of optical imaging probes with the NIR-I window (700–900 nm) or the NIR-II window (1000–1700 nm) emission for diagnosis of nephron-urological diseases. These molecular probes have enabled contrast-enhanced imaging of anatomical structures and physiological function as well as molecular imaging and early diagnosis of acute kidney injury, iatrogenic ureteral injury and bladder cancer. The design strategies of molecular probes are specifically elaborated along with representative imaging applications. The potential challenges and perspectives in this field are also discussed.

Graphical abstract: Near-infrared fluorescent molecular probes for imaging and diagnosis of nephro-urological diseases

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Article information


Submitted
25 May 2020
Accepted
18 Jun 2020
First published
18 Jun 2020

This article is Open Access
All publication charges for this article have been paid for by the Royal Society of Chemistry

Chem. Sci., 2020, Advance Article
Article type
Perspective

Near-infrared fluorescent molecular probes for imaging and diagnosis of nephro-urological diseases

J. Huang and K. Pu, Chem. Sci., 2020, Advance Article , DOI: 10.1039/D0SC02925D

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