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Electro-organic Synthesis – A 21st Century Technique

Abstract

The fierce limitation of fossil fuels and finite ressources influence the scientific community reconsidering chemical synthesis and establishing sustainable techniques. Several auspicious methods have emerged whereas electro-organic conversions attract particular attention from the international academia and industry as environmentally begnin and cost-effective method. An easy application, precise control, and safe conversion of substrates with intermediates only accessible by this way reveal novel pathways in synthetic organic chemistry. The popularity of electricity as reagent is accompanied by the feasible conversion of bio-based feetstocks to limit the carbon footprint. Several milestones have been achieved in electro-organic conversions at flourishing frequency which released various perspectives for forthcoming procesess.

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Article information


Submitted
31 Mar 2020
Accepted
18 May 2020
First published
20 May 2020

This article is Open Access
All publication charges for this article have been paid for by the Royal Society of Chemistry

Chem. Sci., 2020, Accepted Manuscript
Article type
Perspective

Electro-organic Synthesis – A 21st Century Technique

D. Pollok and S. R. Waldvogel, Chem. Sci., 2020, Accepted Manuscript , DOI: 10.1039/D0SC01848A

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