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Issue 33, 2020
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Interpretable molecular models for molybdenum disulfide and insight into selective peptide recognition

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Abstract

Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a layered material with outstanding electrical and optical properties. Numerous studies evaluate the performance in sensors, catalysts, batteries, and composites that can benefit from guidance by simulations in all-atom resolution. However, molecular simulations remain difficult due to lack of reliable models. We introduce an interpretable force field for MoS2 with record performance that reproduces structural, interfacial, and mechanical properties in 0.1% to 5% agreement with experiments. The model overcomes structural instability, deviations in interfacial and mechanical properties by several 100%, and empirical fitting protocols in earlier models. It is compatible with several force fields for molecular dynamics simulation, including the interface force field (IFF), CVFF, DREIDING, PCFF, COMPASS, CHARMM, AMBER, and OPLS-AA. The parameters capture polar covalent bonding, X-ray structure, cleavage energy, infrared spectra, bending stability, bulk modulus, Young's modulus, and contact angles with polar and nonpolar solvents. We utilized the models to uncover the binding mechanism of peptides to the MoS2 basal plane. The binding strength of several 7mer and 8mer peptides scales linearly with surface contact and replacement of surface-bound water molecules, and is tunable in a wide range from −86 to −6 kcal mol−1. The binding selectivity is multifactorial, including major contributions by van-der-Waals coordination and charge matching of certain side groups, orientation of hydrophilic side chains towards water, and conformation flexibility. We explain the relative attraction and role of the 20 amino acids using computational and experimental data. The force field can be used to screen and interpret the assembly of MoS2-based nanomaterials and electrolyte interfaces up to a billion atoms with high accuracy, including multiscale simulations from the quantum scale to the microscale.

Graphical abstract: Interpretable molecular models for molybdenum disulfide and insight into selective peptide recognition

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
10 Mar 2020
Accepted
16 Jul 2020
First published
21 Jul 2020

This article is Open Access
All publication charges for this article have been paid for by the Royal Society of Chemistry

Chem. Sci., 2020,11, 8708-8722
Article type
Edge Article

Interpretable molecular models for molybdenum disulfide and insight into selective peptide recognition

J. Liu, J. Zeng, C. Zhu, J. Miao, Y. Huang and H. Heinz, Chem. Sci., 2020, 11, 8708
DOI: 10.1039/D0SC01443E

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material and it is not used for commercial purposes.

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    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
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    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

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