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Bimetallic metal–organic frameworks and their derivatives

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Abstract

Bimetallic metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) have two different metal ions in the inorganic nodes. According to the metal distribution, the architecture of bimetallic MOFs can be classified into two main categories namely solid solution and core–shell structures. Various strategies have been developed to prepare bimetallic MOFs with controlled compositions and structures. Bimetallic MOFs show a synergistic effect and enhanced properties compared to their monometallic counterparts and have found many applications in the fields of gas adsorption, catalysis, energy storage and conversion, and luminescence sensing. Moreover, bimetallic MOFs can serve as excellent precursors/templates for the synthesis of functional nanomaterials with controlled sizes, compositions, and structures. Bimetallic MOF derivatives show exposed active sites, good stability and conductivity, enabling them to extend their applications to the catalysis of more challenging reactions and electrochemical energy storage and conversion. This review provides an overview of the significant advances in the development of bimetallic MOFs and their derivatives with special emphases on their preparation and applications.

Graphical abstract: Bimetallic metal–organic frameworks and their derivatives

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Article information


Submitted
10 Mar 2020
Accepted
24 Apr 2020
First published
28 Apr 2020

This article is Open Access
All publication charges for this article have been paid for by the Royal Society of Chemistry

Chem. Sci., 2020, Advance Article
Article type
Perspective

Bimetallic metal–organic frameworks and their derivatives

L. Chen, H. Wang, C. Li and Q. Xu, Chem. Sci., 2020, Advance Article , DOI: 10.1039/D0SC01432J

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