Jump to main content
Jump to site search


High-order structures from nucleic acids for biomedical applications

Author affiliations

Abstract

Over the past 40 years, research in the fields of DNA nanotechnology and RNA nanotechnology has taken nucleic acid molecules out of their biological contexts and harnessed their unique base-pairing and self-assembly properties to generate well-defined, organized, and functional supramolecular architectures. Capitalizing on an intrinsic biocompatibility and the ability to tailor size, shape, and functionality from the bottom up, recent work has positioned high-order nucleic acid structures as powerful biomedical tools. This review summarizes advances in nanotechnology that have enabled the fabrication of synthetic nucleic acid structures. Nucleic acid-based platforms for biosensing and therapeutic drug delivery are highlighted. Finally, an outlook that considers the limitations and future challenges for this field is presented.

Graphical abstract: High-order structures from nucleic acids for biomedical applications

Back to tab navigation

Article information


Submitted
14 Oct 2019
Accepted
23 Jan 2020
First published
06 Feb 2020

This article is Open Access

Mater. Chem. Front., 2020, Advance Article
Article type
Review Article

High-order structures from nucleic acids for biomedical applications

A. C. Hill and J. Hall, Mater. Chem. Front., 2020, Advance Article , DOI: 10.1039/C9QM00638A

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material and it is not used for commercial purposes.

Reproduced material should be attributed as follows:

  • For reproduction of material from NJC:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the RSC.
  • For reproduction of material from PCCP:
    [Original citation] - Published by the PCCP Owner Societies.
  • For reproduction of material from PPS:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
  • For reproduction of material from all other RSC journals:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

Information about reproducing material from RSC articles with different licences is available on our Permission Requests page.


Social activity

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements