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Issue 40, 2020
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Unraveling dominant surface physicochemistry to build antimicrobial peptide coatings with supramolecular amphiphiles

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Abstract

With the increasing threat from antibiotic-resistant bacteria, surface modification with antimicrobial peptides (AMP) has been promisingly explored for preventing bacterial infections. Little is known about the critical factors that govern AMP-surface interactions to obtain stable and active coatings. Here, we systematically monitored the adsorption of a designer amphipathic AMP, GL13K, on model surfaces. Self-assembly of the GL13K peptides formed supramolecular amphiphiles that highly adsorbed on negatively charged, polar hydroxyapatite-coated sensors. We further tuned surface charge and/or surface polarity with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au sensors and studied their interactions with adsorbed GL13K. We determined that the surface polarity of the SAM-coated sensors instead of their surface charge was the dominant factor governing AMP/substrate interactions via hydrogen bonding. Our findings will instruct the universal design of efficient self-assembled AMP coatings on biomaterials, biomedical devices and/or natural tissues.

Graphical abstract: Unraveling dominant surface physicochemistry to build antimicrobial peptide coatings with supramolecular amphiphiles

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Article information


Submitted
15 Jun 2020
Accepted
15 Sep 2020
First published
16 Sep 2020

Nanoscale, 2020,12, 20767-20775
Article type
Paper

Unraveling dominant surface physicochemistry to build antimicrobial peptide coatings with supramolecular amphiphiles

Z. Ye, A. C. Kobe, T. Sang and C. Aparicio, Nanoscale, 2020, 12, 20767
DOI: 10.1039/D0NR04526H

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