Jump to main content
Jump to site search
Access to RSC content Close the message box

Continue to access RSC content when you are not at your institution. Follow our step-by-step guide.



Why synthetic virus-like nanoparticles can achieve higher cellular uptake efficiency?

Author affiliations

Abstract

Experimental studies in recent years have demonstrated that the cellular uptake properties of nanoparticles can be improved by mimicking the spiky surfaces of viruses; however, little is known on how the surface topological structure of nanoparticles affects their translocation across the cell membrane. Here, by employing dissipative particle dynamics simulations, the interactions between virus-like nanoparticles (VLPs) and the lipid bilayer are investigated. The analysis of critical force for penetration demonstrates that VLPs with relatively longer and sparser spikes have better penetrability. The internalization pathway of VLPs illustrates that the spikes of VLPs can perturb the bilayer structure after VLPs adhere onto the bilayer. Furthermore, by comparing the translocation process of VLPs and spherical nanoparticles, it is found that the presence of spikes can help to increase the lateral defects in the bilayer, decrease the vertical deformation of the bilayer, and lower the density of nearby lipids during the translocation process. These effects of spikes jointly contribute to the superior penetrability of VLPs. It is expected that these findings not only enrich our understanding of how the surface topological structure affects the cellular uptake, but also pave the way for further development of VLPs for versatile biomedical applications.

Graphical abstract: Why synthetic virus-like nanoparticles can achieve higher cellular uptake efficiency?

Back to tab navigation

Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
24 Apr 2020
Accepted
16 Jun 2020
First published
25 Jun 2020

Nanoscale, 2020, Advance Article
Article type
Paper

Why synthetic virus-like nanoparticles can achieve higher cellular uptake efficiency?

J. Li, J. Wang, Q. Yao, T. Li, Y. Yan, Z. Li and J. Zhang, Nanoscale, 2020, Advance Article , DOI: 10.1039/D0NR03234D

Social activity

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements