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Correlations of acidity-basicity of solvent treated layered double hydroxides/oxides and their CO2 capture performance

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Abstract

The basicity and acidity of solvent-treated layered double hydroxide (ST-LDHs) and their layered double oxides (ST-LDOs) have been fully studied using Hammett titration, in situ FTIR, CO2-TPD and NH3-TPD. Five solvents (ethanol, acetone, isopropanol, ethyl acetate and 1-hexanol) were selected to treat [Mg0.72Al0.28(OH)2](CO3)0.14 (Mg2.5Al-CO3 LDH) and compared with traditional LDH co-precipitated from water. The Brønsted basicity strength of the ST-LDHs and ST-LDOs increased but was accompanied by a decrease in basic site density. In addition, the Lewis acidity of ST-LDOs also changes significantly, with medium strength Lewis acid sites dissapearing after solvent treatment. We found that the CO2 capture capacity of solvent treated LDOs is 50% higher than that of traditional co-precipitated LDO sample. The ethanol treated LDO exhibited the highest CO2 uptake of 1.01 mmol g−1. The observed CO2 capture performance of the ST-LDOs correlates linearly with the ratio of total acid sites to total basic sites.

Graphical abstract: Correlations of acidity-basicity of solvent treated layered double hydroxides/oxides and their CO2 capture performance

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
01 May 2020
Accepted
17 Jun 2020
First published
18 Jun 2020

This article is Open Access

Dalton Trans., 2020, Advance Article
Article type
Paper

Correlations of acidity-basicity of solvent treated layered double hydroxides/oxides and their CO2 capture performance

D. W. J. Leung, C. Chen, J. Buffet and D. O'Hare, Dalton Trans., 2020, Advance Article , DOI: 10.1039/D0DT01587C

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