Jump to main content
Jump to site search


Is density functional theory accurate for lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase enzymes?

Author affiliations

Abstract

The lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) enzymes boost polysaccharide depolymerization through oxidative chemistry, which has fueled the hope for more energy-efficient production of biofuel. We have recently proposed a mechanism for the oxidation of the polysaccharide substrate (E. D. Hedegård and U. Ryde, Chem. Sci., 2018, 9, 3866–3880). In this mechanism, intermediates with superoxide, oxyl, as well as hydroxyl (i.e. [CuO2]+, [CuO]+ and [CuOH]2+) cores were involved. These complexes can have both singlet and triplet spin states, and both spin-states may be important for how LPMOs function during catalytic turnover. Previous calculations on LPMOs have exclusively been based on density functional theory (DFT). However, different DFT functionals are known to display large differences for spin-state splittings in transition-metal complexes, and this has also been an issue for LPMOs. In this paper, we study the accuracy of DFT for spin-state splittings in superoxide, oxyl, and hydroxyl intermediates involved in LPMO turnover. As reference we employ multiconfigurational perturbation theory (CASPT2).

Graphical abstract: Is density functional theory accurate for lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase enzymes?

Back to tab navigation

Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
21 Nov 2019
Accepted
23 Dec 2019
First published
23 Dec 2019

This article is Open Access

Dalton Trans., 2020, Advance Article
Article type
Paper

Is density functional theory accurate for lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase enzymes?

E. D. Larsson, G. Dong, V. Veryazov, U. Ryde and E. D. Hedegård, Dalton Trans., 2020, Advance Article , DOI: 10.1039/C9DT04486H

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material.

Reproduced material should be attributed as follows:

  • For reproduction of material from NJC:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the RSC.
  • For reproduction of material from PCCP:
    [Original citation] - Published by the PCCP Owner Societies.
  • For reproduction of material from PPS:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
  • For reproduction of material from all other RSC journals:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

Information about reproducing material from RSC articles with different licences is available on our Permission Requests page.


Social activity

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements