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Self-assembled peptide–inorganic nanoparticle superstructures: from component design to applications

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Abstract

Peptides have become excellent platforms for the design of peptide–nanoparticle hybrid superstructures, owing to their self-assembly and binding/recognition capabilities. Morover, peptide sequences can be encoded and modified to finely tune the structure of the hybrid systems and pursue functionalities that hold promise in an array of high-end applications. This feature article summarizes the different methodologies that have been developed to obtain self-assembled peptide–inorganic nanoparticle hybrid architectures, and discusses how the proper encoding of the peptide sequences can be used for tailoring the architecture and/or functionality of the final systems. We also describe the applications of these hybrid superstructures in different fields, with a brief look at future possibilities towards the development of new functional hybrid materials.

Graphical abstract: Self-assembled peptide–inorganic nanoparticle superstructures: from component design to applications

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Article information


Submitted
22 Apr 2020
Accepted
26 May 2020
First published
04 Jun 2020

Chem. Commun., 2020, Advance Article
Article type
Feature Article

Self-assembled peptide–inorganic nanoparticle superstructures: from component design to applications

C. Pigliacelli, R. Sánchez-Fernández, M. D. García, C. Peinador and E. Pazos, Chem. Commun., 2020, Advance Article , DOI: 10.1039/D0CC02914A

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