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Spectroelectrochemistry, the future of visualizing electrode processes by hyphenating electrochemistry with spectroscopic techniques

Abstract

The combination of electrochemistry and spectroscopy, known as spectroelectrochemistry (SEC), is an established technique. By combining these two techniques, the relevance of the data obtained is greater than what it would be when using them independently. A number of review papers have been published on this subject, mostly written for experts in the field and focused on recent advances. In this review, written for both the novice in the field and the more experienced reader, the focus is not on the past but on the future. The scope is narrowed down to four techniques the authors claim to have most potential for the future, namely: infrared spectroelectrochemistry (IR-SEC), Raman spectroelectrochemistry (Raman-SEC), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroelectrochemistry (NMR-SEC) and perhaps slightly more controversial, but certainly promising, electrochemistry mass-spectrometry (EC-MS).

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Article information


Submitted
21 Oct 2019
Accepted
13 Jan 2020
First published
15 Jan 2020

This article is Open Access

Analyst, 2020, Accepted Manuscript
Article type
Critical Review

Spectroelectrochemistry, the future of visualizing electrode processes by hyphenating electrochemistry with spectroscopic techniques

J. J. A. Lozeman, P. Führer, W. Olthuis and M. Odijk, Analyst, 2020, Accepted Manuscript , DOI: 10.1039/C9AN02105A

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