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Issue 17, 2020
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Vesicle adhesion in the electrostatic strong-coupling regime studied by time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering

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Abstract

We have used time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to study the adhesion of lipid vesicles in the electrostatic strong-coupling regime induced by divalent ions. The bilayer structure and the interbilayer distance dw between adhered vesicles was studied for different DOPC:DOPS mixtures varying the surface charge density of the membrane, as well as for different divalent ions, such as Ca2+, Sr2+, and Zn2+. The results are in good agreement with the strong coupling theory predicting the adhesion state and the corresponding like-charge attraction based on ion-correlations. Using SAXS combined with the stopped-flow rapid mixing technique, we find that in highly charged bilayers the adhesion state is only of transient nature, and that the adhering vesicles subsequently transform to a phase of multilamellar vesicles, again with an inter-bilayer distance according to the theory of strong binding. Aside from the stopped-flow SAXS instrumentations used primarily for these results, we also evaluate microfluidic sample environments for vesicle SAXS in view of future extension of this work.

Graphical abstract: Vesicle adhesion in the electrostatic strong-coupling regime studied by time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
13 Feb 2020
Accepted
03 Apr 2020
First published
16 Apr 2020

This article is Open Access

Soft Matter, 2020,16, 4142-4154
Article type
Paper

Vesicle adhesion in the electrostatic strong-coupling regime studied by time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering

K. Komorowski, J. Schaeper, M. Sztucki, L. Sharpnack, G. Brehm, S. Köster and T. Salditt, Soft Matter, 2020, 16, 4142 DOI: 10.1039/D0SM00259C

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