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Issue 22, 2020
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Enzyme encapsulation by protein cages

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Abstract

Protein cages are hollow protein shells with a nanometric cavity that can be filled with useful materials. The encapsulating nature of the cages means that they are particularly attractive for loading with biological macromolecules, affording the guests protection in conditions where they may be degraded. Given the importance of proteins in both industrial and all cellular processes, encapsulation of functional protein cargoes, particularly enzymes, are of high interest both for in vivo diagnostic and therapeutic use as well as for ex vivo applications. Increasing knowledge of protein cage structures at high resolution along with recent advances in producing artificial protein cages means that they can now be designed with various attachment chemistries on their internal surfaces – a useful tool for cargo capture. Here we review the different available attachment strategies that have recently been successfully demonstrated for enzyme encapsulation in protein cages and consider their future potential.

Graphical abstract: Enzyme encapsulation by protein cages

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Article information


Submitted
28 Dec 2019
Accepted
10 Mar 2020
First published
01 Apr 2020

This article is Open Access

RSC Adv., 2020,10, 13293-13301
Article type
Review Article

Enzyme encapsulation by protein cages

S. Chakraborti, T. Lin, S. Glatt and J. G. Heddle, RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 13293
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA10983H

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material and it is not used for commercial purposes.

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    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

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