Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 17, 2020
Previous Article Next Article

DNA-directed arrangement of soft synthetic compartments and their behavior in vitro and in vivo

Author affiliations

Abstract

DNA has been widely used as a key tether to promote self-organization of super-assemblies with emergent properties. However, control of this process is still challenging for compartment assemblies and to date the resulting assemblies have unstable membranes precluding in vitro and in vivo testing. Here we present our approach to overcome these limitations, by manipulating molecular factors such as compartment membrane composition and DNA surface density, thereby controlling the size and stability of the resulting DNA-linked compartment clusters. The soft, flexible character of the polymer membrane and low number of ssDNA remaining exposed after cluster formation determine the interaction of these clusters with the cell surface. These clusters exhibit in vivo stability and lack of toxicity in a zebrafish model. To display the breadth of therapeutic applications attainable with our system, we encapsulated the medically established enzyme laccase within the inner compartment and demonstrated its activity within the clustered compartments. Most importantly, these clusters can interact selectively with different cell lines, opening a new strategy to modify and expand cellular functions by attaching such pre-organized soft DNA-mediated compartment clusters on cell surfaces for cell engineering or therapeutic applications.

Graphical abstract: DNA-directed arrangement of soft synthetic compartments and their behavior in vitro and in vivo

Back to tab navigation

Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
13 Jan 2020
Accepted
19 Apr 2020
First published
20 Apr 2020

This article is Open Access

Nanoscale, 2020,12, 9786-9799
Article type
Paper

DNA-directed arrangement of soft synthetic compartments and their behavior in vitro and in vivo

J. Liu, I. Craciun, A. Belluati, D. Wu, S. Sieber, T. Einfalt, D. Witzigmann, M. Chami, J. Huwyler and C. G. Palivan, Nanoscale, 2020, 12, 9786 DOI: 10.1039/D0NR00361A

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported Licence. You can use material from this article in other publications, without requesting further permission from the RSC, provided that the correct acknowledgement is given and it is not used for commercial purposes.

To request permission to reproduce material from this article in a commercial publication, please go to the Copyright Clearance Center request page.

If you are an author contributing to an RSC publication, you do not need to request permission provided correct acknowledgement is given.

If you are the author of this article, you do not need to request permission to reproduce figures and diagrams provided correct acknowledgement is given. If you want to reproduce the whole article in a third-party commercial publication (excluding your thesis/dissertation for which permission is not required) please go to the Copyright Clearance Center request page.

Read more about how to correctly acknowledge RSC content.


Social activity

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements