Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 9, 2019
Previous Article Next Article

Human blood platelets contract in perpendicular direction to shear flow

Author affiliations

Abstract

In their physiological environment, blood platelets are permanently exposed to shear forces caused by blood flow. Within this surrounding, they generate contractile forces that eventually lead to a compaction of the blood clot. Here, we present a microfluidic chamber that combines hydrogel-based traction force microscopy with a controlled shear environment, and investigate the force fields platelets generate when exposed to shear flow in a spatio-temporally resolved manner. We find that for shear rates between 14 s−1 to 33 s−1, the general contraction behavior in terms of force distribution and magnitude does not differ from no-flow conditions. The main direction of contraction, however, does respond to the externally applied stress. At high shear stress, we observe an angle of about 90° between flow direction and main contraction axis. We explain this observation by the distribution of the stress acting on the adherent cell: the observed angle provides the most stable situation for the cell experiencing the shear flow, as supported by a finite element method simulation of the stresses along the platelet boundary.

Graphical abstract: Human blood platelets contract in perpendicular direction to shear flow

Back to tab navigation

Supplementary files

Publication details

The article was received on 19 Oct 2018, accepted on 28 Jan 2019 and first published on 29 Jan 2019


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C8SM02136H
Citation: Soft Matter, 2019,15, 2009-2019
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY-NC license
  •   Request permissions

    Human blood platelets contract in perpendicular direction to shear flow

    J. Hanke, C. Ranke, E. Perego and S. Köster, Soft Matter, 2019, 15, 2009
    DOI: 10.1039/C8SM02136H

    This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material and it is not used for commercial purposes.

    Reproduced material should be attributed as follows:

    • For reproduction of material from NJC:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the RSC.
    • For reproduction of material from PCCP:
      [Original citation] - Published by the PCCP Owner Societies.
    • For reproduction of material from PPS:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
    • For reproduction of material from all other RSC journals:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

    Information about reproducing material from RSC articles with different licences is available on our Permission Requests page.

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements