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Issue 24, 2019
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Bio-based building blocks from 5-hydroxymethylfurfural via 1-hydroxyhexane-2,5-dione as intermediate

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Abstract

The limits to the supply of fossil resources and their ever increasing use forces us to think about future scenarios for fuels and chemicals. The platform chemical 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural (HMF) can be obtained from biomass in good yield and has the potential to be converted in just a few steps into a multitude of interesting products. Over the last 20 years, the conversion of HMF to 1-hydroxyhexane-2,5-dione (HHD) has been studied by several groups. It is possible to convert HMF into HHD by hydrogenation/hydrolytic ring opening reaction in aqueous phase using various heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysts. This review addresses both the state of the art of HHD synthesis, including mechanistic aspects of its formation, as well as the recent progress in the application of HHD as a building block for many useful chemicals including pyrroles, cyclopentanone derivatives and triols.

Graphical abstract: Bio-based building blocks from 5-hydroxymethylfurfural via 1-hydroxyhexane-2,5-dione as intermediate

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Article information


Submitted
16 Mar 2019
Accepted
31 May 2019
First published
06 Jun 2019

This article is Open Access
All publication charges for this article have been paid for by the Royal Society of Chemistry

Chem. Sci., 2019,10, 6024-6034
Article type
Minireview

Bio-based building blocks from 5-hydroxymethylfurfural via 1-hydroxyhexane-2,5-dione as intermediate

B. Wozniak, S. Tin and J. G. de Vries, Chem. Sci., 2019, 10, 6024
DOI: 10.1039/C9SC01309A

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    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

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