Jump to main content
Jump to site search
Access to RSC content Close the message box

Continue to access RSC content when you are not at your institution. Follow our step-by-step guide.


Issue 43, 2019
Previous Article Next Article

Antibody-targeting of ultra-small nanoparticles enhances imaging sensitivity and enables longitudinal tracking of multiple myeloma

Author affiliations

Abstract

Monitoring malignant progression and disease recurrence post-therapy are central challenges to improving the outcomes of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Whereas current detection methods that rely upon bone marrow examination allow for precise monitoring of minimal residual disease and can help to elucidate clonal evolution, they do not take into account the spatial heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment. As such, they are uninformative as to the localization of malignant plasma cells and may lead to false negative results. With respect to the latter challenge, clinically-available imaging agents are neither sufficiently sensitive nor specific enough to detect minute plasma cell populations. Here, we sought to explore methods by which to improve detection of MM cells within their natural bone marrow environment, using whole-animal magnetic resonance imaging to longitudinally monitor early-stage disease as well as to enhance tumor detection after systemic therapy. We conducted a proof-of-concept study to demonstrate that ultra-small (<5 nm) gadolinium-containing nanoparticles bound to full-length antibodies against the B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) exhibit rapid tumor uptake followed by renal clearance, improving the signal-to-noise ratio for MM detection beyond levels that are currently afforded by other FDA-approved clinical imaging modalities. We anticipate that when combined with bone marrow or blood biopsy, such imaging constructs could help to augment the effective management of patients with MM.

Graphical abstract: Antibody-targeting of ultra-small nanoparticles enhances imaging sensitivity and enables longitudinal tracking of multiple myeloma

Back to tab navigation

Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
30 Jul 2019
Accepted
23 Sep 2019
First published
16 Oct 2019

This article is Open Access

Nanoscale, 2019,11, 20485-20496
Article type
Communication

Antibody-targeting of ultra-small nanoparticles enhances imaging sensitivity and enables longitudinal tracking of multiple myeloma

A. Detappe, M. Reidy, Y. Yu, C. Mathieu, H. V.-T. Nguyen, T. P. Coroller, F. Lam, P. Jarolim, P. Harvey, A. Protti, Q. Nguyen, J. A. Johnson, Y. Cremillieux, O. Tillement, I. M. Ghobrial and P. P. Ghoroghchian, Nanoscale, 2019, 11, 20485
DOI: 10.1039/C9NR06512A

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material and it is not used for commercial purposes.

Reproduced material should be attributed as follows:

  • For reproduction of material from NJC:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the RSC.
  • For reproduction of material from PCCP:
    [Original citation] - Published by the PCCP Owner Societies.
  • For reproduction of material from PPS:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
  • For reproduction of material from all other RSC journals:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

Information about reproducing material from RSC articles with different licences is available on our Permission Requests page.


Social activity

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements