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ssDNA-amphiphile architecture used to control dimensions of DNA nanotubes

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Abstract

Controlling the dimensions of DNA nanotubes is of great interest as they can be used in different applications ranging from functional elements in nanodevices to carriers for drug delivery. ssDNA-amphiphiles composed of a ssDNA headgroup, a hydrophobic dialkyl tail and a polycarbon spacer between the tail and the headgroup, self-assemble into hollow DNA nanotubes by forming bilayer nanotapes that transition from twisted nanotapes, to helical nanotapes, to nanotubes. The presence of the DNA nanotubes is verified via cryo-TEM and SAXS. We further explore the effect of the ssDNA secondary structure and tail length on the assembly of the ssDNA-amphiphiles. We demonstrate that the presence of intermolecular G-quadruplexes in the ssDNA sequence dictates the nanotube length. The nanotube diameter is controlled by the hydrophobic tail length, and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are employed to elucidate the tail design impact on assembly.

Graphical abstract: ssDNA-amphiphile architecture used to control dimensions of DNA nanotubes

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Publication details

The article was received on 03 May 2019, accepted on 11 Sep 2019 and first published on 11 Sep 2019


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C9NR03761F
Nanoscale, 2019, Advance Article

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    ssDNA-amphiphile architecture used to control dimensions of DNA nanotubes

    H. Kuang, T. E. Gartner III, M. Dorneles de Mello, J. Guo, X. Zuo, M. Tsapatsis, A. Jayaraman and E. Kokkoli, Nanoscale, 2019, Advance Article , DOI: 10.1039/C9NR03761F

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