Jump to main content
Jump to site search


Life sensors: current advances in oxygen sensing by lanthanide complexes

Author affiliations

Abstract

Aerobes, such as animals, plants, fungi, and several bacteria, depend upon oxygen to live. Consequently, oxygen sensing comprises an emerging technique in many research fields, ranging from medicine to marine science. In the last few years, lanthanide-based oxygen sensors have seen significant progress in the field of optical sensing technology owing to their long luminescence lifetimes and sharp luminescence bands. These sensors provide an alternative to expensive transition metal-based sensors, such as platinum and ruthenium complexes. This review covers the development and design of lanthanide-based oxygen sensors, along with their photophysical properties related to oxygen sensing. These lanthanide complexes achieve oxygen sensing through the excited state quenching of the intermediate triplet state of the antenna chromophore, which suggests that the sensitivity to pO2 arises from the rate of forward intramolecular energy transfer from the antenna triplet state to the accepting Ln3+ ion being competitive with bimolecular quenching by oxygen. As Tb(III) complexes are highly oxygen sensitive, they are favored to be good oxygen sensors, while the sensitivity of Eu(III), Dy(III), Nd(III), and Gd(III) complexes is low.

Graphical abstract: Life sensors: current advances in oxygen sensing by lanthanide complexes

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 02 Oct 2018, accepted on 28 Nov 2018 and first published on 28 Nov 2018


Article type: Perspective
DOI: 10.1039/C8NJ04993A
Citation: New J. Chem., 2019, Advance Article
  •   Request permissions

    Life sensors: current advances in oxygen sensing by lanthanide complexes

    K. Iman and M. Shahid, New J. Chem., 2019, Advance Article , DOI: 10.1039/C8NJ04993A

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements