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Physical effects of dietary fibres on simulated luminal flow, studied by in-vitro dynamic gastrointestinal digestion and fermentation

Abstract

During the transit through the gastrointestinal tract, fibre undergoes physical changes not usually included in in-vitro digestion studies even though they influence nutrient diffusion and might play a role in gut microbiota growth. The aim of this study was to evaluate how physical fibre properties influence the physical properties of gastrointestinal fluids using a gastrointestinal model (stomach, small intestine, ascending colon, transverse colon, and descending colon) (simgi®). Analysis by rheological and particle size characterisation, microbiota composition and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) determination allows achievement of this goal. First, water holding capacity (WHC), microstructure, and viscosity of eight fibres plus agar were tested. Based on results the following fibres: potato, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), psyllium fibres, and agar (as a control) were selected for addition to a medium growth (GNMF) that was used for feeding the stomach/small intestine and colon compartments in the simgi®. During gastrointestinal digestion, GNMF was collected at 5, 30 and 55 minutes of processing at the gastric stage and after the intestinal stage. Then, samples of GNMF with faecal slurry were collected at 0, 24 and 48 h of colonic fermentation. Results showed fibre-dependence on apparent viscosity. Although psyllium was partially broken down in the stomach (decrease in particle size), it was the most viscous at the colonic stage, opposite to potato fibre, but both led to the highest total SFCA and acetic acid production profile. On a microbiological level, the most relevant increase of bacterial growth was observed in faecal Lactobacillus species, especially for HPMC and potato fibre, that were not digested until reaching the colon. Besides fibre fermentability, viscosity also influences microbial growth, and it is necessary to characterise these changes to understand fibre functionality.

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Publication details

The article was received on 07 Mar 2019, accepted on 13 May 2019 and first published on 13 May 2019


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C9FO00485H
Food Funct., 2019, Accepted Manuscript
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY license
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    Physical effects of dietary fibres on simulated luminal flow, studied by in-vitro dynamic gastrointestinal digestion and fermentation

    A. Tamargo, C. Cueva, M. D. Alvarez, B. Herranz, M. V. Moreno-Arribas and L. Laguna, Food Funct., 2019, Accepted Manuscript , DOI: 10.1039/C9FO00485H

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