Jump to main content
Jump to site search


Development of a suitable detection method for silver nanoparticles in fish tissue using single particle ICP-MS

Author affiliations

Abstract

To determine bioaccumulation potential, suitable methods to extract and quantify engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) from fish tissues are required. The aim was to develop single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) protocols for liver tissue from rainbow trout and to assess the suitability of enzymatic (proteinase K) and alkali (tetramethylammonium hydroxide; TMAH) methods of extraction. A total of four different extractants were used: proteinase K or TMAH both with/without CaCl2. Spike recovery tests using equal mass concentrations (50 ng L−1 of Ag) as silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) or AgNO3 were conducted. Extractants alone spiked with Ag NPs showed recovery similar to ultrapure deionised water (95–105%). However, the TMAH alone caused AgNO3 to precipitate and was not a suitable extractant. A second series of experiments looked at spike recovery on liver tissue samples. Proteinase K, with or without CaCl2, failed to completely digest the tissues. Only TMAH + CaCl2 demonstrated the ability to solubilise the liver. Ag NPs spiked onto liver tissues and analysed 24 h later, also showed no significant change in particle size distribution or particle mass concentration compared to those freshly spiked without liver present. The particle number concentration fell significantly to around 80% of the freshly spiked Ag NPs. Samples from an in vivo dietary study where fish were fed nominally 100 mg kg−1 Ag as either AgNO3 or Ag NPs were analysed to demonstrate the utility of the method. There was no significant difference between the particle number concentration, mean particle size or particle mass concentration between the in vivo AgNO3 and Ag NP treatment liver tissues. For example, the particle number concentrations were 68.3 ± 33.1 and 76.9 ± 51.6 × 109 particle per g dw liver in the AgNO3 and Ag NPs, respectively. In conclusion, a TMAH + CaCl2 extraction method was developed with good recovery and utility for detecting Ag NPs from in vivo exposures of trout liver.

Graphical abstract: Development of a suitable detection method for silver nanoparticles in fish tissue using single particle ICP-MS

Back to tab navigation

Supplementary files

Publication details

The article was received on 13 May 2019, accepted on 12 Sep 2019 and first published on 11 Oct 2019


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C9EN00547A
Environ. Sci.: Nano, 2019, Advance Article
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY-NC license
  •   Request permissions

    Development of a suitable detection method for silver nanoparticles in fish tissue using single particle ICP-MS

    N. J. Clark, R. Clough, D. Boyle and R. D. Handy, Environ. Sci.: Nano, 2019, Advance Article , DOI: 10.1039/C9EN00547A

    This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material and it is not used for commercial purposes.

    Reproduced material should be attributed as follows:

    • For reproduction of material from NJC:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the RSC.
    • For reproduction of material from PCCP:
      [Original citation] - Published by the PCCP Owner Societies.
    • For reproduction of material from PPS:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
    • For reproduction of material from all other RSC journals:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

    Information about reproducing material from RSC articles with different licences is available on our Permission Requests page.

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements