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Issue 3, 2018
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Polysulfides made from re-purposed waste are sustainable materials for removing iron from water

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Abstract

Water contaminated with Fe3+ is undesirable because it can result in discoloured plumbing fixtures, clogging, and a poor taste and aesthetic profile for drinking water. At high levels, Fe3+ can also promote the growth of unwanted bacteria, so environmental agencies and water authorities typically regulate the amount of Fe3+ in municipal water and wastewater. Here, polysulfide sorbents—prepared from elemental sulfur and unsaturated cooking oils—are used to remove Fe3+ contaminants from water. The sorbent is low-cost and sustainable, as it can be prepared entirely from waste. The preparation of this material using microwave heating and its application in iron capture are two important advances in the growing field of sulfur polymers.

Graphical abstract: Polysulfides made from re-purposed waste are sustainable materials for removing iron from water

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
31 Oct 2017
Accepted
19 Dec 2017
First published
03 Jan 2018

This article is Open Access

RSC Adv., 2018,8, 1232-1236
Article type
Paper

Polysulfides made from re-purposed waste are sustainable materials for removing iron from water

N. A. Lundquist, M. J. H. Worthington, N. Adamson, C. T. Gibson, M. R. Johnston, A. V. Ellis and J. M. Chalker, RSC Adv., 2018, 8, 1232
DOI: 10.1039/C7RA11999B

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