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Issue 3, 2017
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Toward a mild dehydroformylation using base-metal catalysis

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Abstract

Dehydroformylation, or the reaction of aldehydes to produce alkenes, hydrogen gas, and carbon monoxide, is a powerful transformation that is underdeveloped despite the high industrial importance of the reverse reaction, hydroformylation. Interestingly, nature routinely performs a related transformation, oxidative dehydroformylation, in the biosynthesis of cholesterol and related sterols under mild conditions using base-metal catalysts. In contrast, chemists have recently developed a non-oxidative dehydroformylation method; however, it requires high temperatures and a precious-metal catalyst. Careful study of both approaches has informed our efforts to design a base-metal catalyzed, mild dehydroformylation method that incorporates benefits from each while avoiding several of their respective disadvantages. Importantly, we show that cooperative base metal catalysis presents a powerful, mechanistically unique approach to reactions which are difficult to achieve using conventional catalyst design.

Graphical abstract: Toward a mild dehydroformylation using base-metal catalysis

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
14 Oct 2016
Accepted
08 Nov 2016
First published
09 Nov 2016

This article is Open Access
All publication charges for this article have been paid for by the Royal Society of Chemistry

Chem. Sci., 2017,8, 1954-1959
Article type
Edge Article

Toward a mild dehydroformylation using base-metal catalysis

D. J. Abrams, J. G. West and E. J. Sorensen, Chem. Sci., 2017, 8, 1954
DOI: 10.1039/C6SC04607J

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