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Issue 11, 2017
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Increase of enzyme activity through specific covalent modification with fragments

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Abstract

Modulation of enzyme activity is a powerful means of probing cellular function and can be exploited for diverse applications. Here, we explore a method of enzyme activation where covalent tethering of a small molecule to an enzyme can increase catalytic activity (kcat/KM) up to 35-fold. Using a bacterial glycoside hydrolase, BtGH84, we demonstrate how small molecule “fragments”, identified as activators in free solution, can be covalently tethered to the protein using Michael-addition chemistry. We show how tethering generates a constitutively-activated enzyme-fragment conjugate, which displays both improved catalytic efficiency and increased susceptibility to certain inhibitor classes. Structure guided modifications of the tethered fragment demonstrate how specific interactions between the fragment and the enzyme influence the extent of activation. This work suggests that a similar approach may be used to modulate the activity of enzymes such as to improve catalytic efficiency or increase inhibitor susceptibility.

Graphical abstract: Increase of enzyme activity through specific covalent modification with fragments

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
02 May 2017
Accepted
26 Sep 2017
First published
27 Sep 2017

This article is Open Access
All publication charges for this article have been paid for by the Royal Society of Chemistry

Chem. Sci., 2017,8, 7772-7779
Article type
Edge Article

Increase of enzyme activity through specific covalent modification with fragments

J. F. Darby, M. Atobe, J. D. Firth, P. Bond, G. J. Davies, P. O'Brien and R. E. Hubbard, Chem. Sci., 2017, 8, 7772
DOI: 10.1039/C7SC01966A

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    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

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