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Issue 7, 2017
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Bacterial iron-oxide nanowires from biofilm waste as a new adsorbent for the removal of arsenic from water

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Abstract

Biofilm, generated by the bacteria in the groundwater pumping system pipelines of the Salt Interception Scheme on the River Murray in South Australia is discarded as a waste material accumulated after periodic cleaning of the pipes. Structural and chemical composition characterizations confirm that this waste material is composed of amorphous twisted iron-oxide nanowires (ION), generated by bacteria, and they have a unique structure and properties. The adsorption performance of these iron-oxide nanowires for arsenic removal from water was evaluated to define their adsorption capacity for As(III) and As(V) and kinetics. Obtained results demonstrate considerable adsorption properties of this waste biological material and suggest its promising application as a new and low-cost adsorbent for water treatment.

Graphical abstract: Bacterial iron-oxide nanowires from biofilm waste as a new adsorbent for the removal of arsenic from water

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
06 Nov 2016
Accepted
28 Nov 2016
First published
16 Jan 2017

This article is Open Access

RSC Adv., 2017,7, 3941-3948
Article type
Paper

Bacterial iron-oxide nanowires from biofilm waste as a new adsorbent for the removal of arsenic from water

I. Andjelkovic, S. Azari, M. Erkelens, P. Forward, M. F. Lambert and D. Losic, RSC Adv., 2017, 7, 3941
DOI: 10.1039/C6RA26379H

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    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

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