Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 7, 2017
Previous Article Next Article

Synthesis of highly functionalised plasma polymer films from protonated precursor ions via the plasma α–γ transition

Author affiliations

Abstract

Chemically functionalized surfaces may be produced via plasma polymerization, however a high degree of functional group retention is often difficult to achieve. Here, the plasma polymerization of three structurally related ester precursors, ethyl isobutyrate (EIB), methyl isobutyrate (MIB) and ethyl trimethylacetate (ETMA) is compared at low and high pressure. In moving from a low pressure to higher pressure regime, significant changes in the plasma chemistry and resulting plasma polymer deposit were observed with much higher retention of chemical functionality at the higher pressure observed. Until now these changes would have been attributed to a decrease in the energy/molecule, however we show by direct measurement of the chemistry and physics of the plasma that there is fundamental shift in the properties of the plasma and surface interactions which explain the results. At low pressure (α regime) precursor fragmentation and neutral deposition dominate resulting in poor functional group retention. Increasing the pressure such that the sheath region close to surfaces becomes collisional (γ regime) favours production of protonated precursor ions which retain functionality and dominate the deposition process rather than radical species.

Graphical abstract: Synthesis of highly functionalised plasma polymer films from protonated precursor ions via the plasma α–γ transition

Back to tab navigation

Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
18 Dec 2016
Accepted
01 Feb 2017
First published
01 Feb 2017

This article is Open Access

Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017,19, 5637-5646
Article type
Paper

Synthesis of highly functionalised plasma polymer films from protonated precursor ions via the plasma α–γ transition

S. Saboohi, B. R. Coad, H. J. Griesser, A. Michelmore and R. D. Short, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017, 19, 5637
DOI: 10.1039/C6CP08630F

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material.

Reproduced material should be attributed as follows:

  • For reproduction of material from NJC:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the RSC.
  • For reproduction of material from PCCP:
    [Original citation] - Published by the PCCP Owner Societies.
  • For reproduction of material from PPS:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
  • For reproduction of material from all other RSC journals:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

Information about reproducing material from RSC articles with different licences is available on our Permission Requests page.


Social activity

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements