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Issue 3, 2016
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Particle transport through an inductively coupled plasma torch: elemental droplet evaporation

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Abstract

We studied the transport of copper droplets through an inductively coupled plasma, connected to the sampling cone of a mass spectrometer, by means of a computational model. The sample droplets are followed until they become evaporated. They are inserted as liquid particles from the central inlet and the effects of injection position (i.e. “on” and “off” axis), droplet diameter, as well as mass loading flow rate are investigated. It is shown that more “on-axis” injection of the droplets leads to a more straight path line, so that the droplets move less in the radial direction and are evaporated more on the central axis, enabling a better sample transfer efficiency to the sampler cone. Furthermore, there are optimum ranges of diameters and flow rates, which guarantee the proper position of evaporation along the torch, i.e. not too early, so that the sample can get lost in the torch, and not too late, which reduces the chance of becoming ionized before reaching the sampler.

Graphical abstract: Particle transport through an inductively coupled plasma torch: elemental droplet evaporation

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Publication details

The article was received on 28 Apr 2015, accepted on 01 Jul 2015 and first published on 07 Jul 2015


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C5JA00162E
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2016,31, 631-641

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    Particle transport through an inductively coupled plasma torch: elemental droplet evaporation

    M. Aghaei and A. Bogaerts, J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2016, 31, 631
    DOI: 10.1039/C5JA00162E

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