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Issue 2, 2016
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Nanofabricated structures and microfluidic devices for bacteria: from techniques to biology

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Abstract

Nanofabricated structures and microfluidic technologies are increasingly being used to study bacteria because of their precise spatial and temporal control. They have facilitated studying many long-standing questions regarding growth, chemotaxis and cell-fate switching, and opened up new areas such as probing the effect of boundary geometries on the subcellular structure and social behavior of bacteria. We review the use of nano/microfabricated structures that spatially separate bacteria for quantitative analyses and that provide topological constraints on their growth and chemical communications. These approaches are becoming modular and broadly applicable, and show a strong potential for dissecting the complex life of bacteria at various scales and engineering synthetic microbial societies.

Graphical abstract: Nanofabricated structures and microfluidic devices for bacteria: from techniques to biology

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Article information


Submitted
30 Jun 2015
First published
18 Sep 2015

Chem. Soc. Rev., 2016,45, 268-280
Article type
Tutorial Review
Author version available

Nanofabricated structures and microfluidic devices for bacteria: from techniques to biology

F. Wu and C. Dekker, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2016, 45, 268
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00514K

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