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Issue 33, 2016
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Room temperature differential conductance measurements of triethylamine molecules adsorbed on Si(001)

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Abstract

We have measured the differential conductance of the triethylamine molecule (N(CH2CH3)3) adsorbed on Si(001)-2 × 1 at room temperature using scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Triethylamine can be engaged in a dative bonding with a silicon dimer, forming a Si–Si–N(CH2CH3)3 unit. We have examined the datively bonded adduct, either as an isolated molecule, or within an ordered molecular domain (reconstructed 4 × 2). The differential conductance curves, supported by DFT calculations, show that in the explored energy window (±2.5 near the Fermi level) the main features stem from the uncapped dangling bonds of the reacted dimer and of the adjacent unreacted ones that are electronically coupled The formation of a molecular domain, in which one dimer in two is left unreacted, is reflected in a shift of the up dimer atom occupied level away from the Fermi level, likely due to an increased π-bonding strength. In stark contrast with the preceding, pairs of dissociated molecule (a minority species) are electronically decoupled from the dimer dangling bond states. DFT calculation show that the lone-pair of the Si–N(CH2CH3)2 is a shallow level, that is clearly seen in the differential conductance curve.

Graphical abstract: Room temperature differential conductance measurements of triethylamine molecules adsorbed on Si(001)

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Article information


Submitted
21 Jun 2016
Accepted
02 Aug 2016
First published
02 Aug 2016

Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016,18, 23231-23237
Article type
Paper

Room temperature differential conductance measurements of triethylamine molecules adsorbed on Si(001)

A. Naitabdi, F. Rochet, S. Carniato, F. Bournel and J. Gallet, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 23231
DOI: 10.1039/C6CP04350J

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