Jump to main content
Jump to site search
SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE Close the message box

Maintenance work is planned for Monday 16 August 2021 from 07:00 to 23:59 (BST).

Website performance may be temporarily affected and you may not be able to access some PDFs or images. If this does happen, refreshing your web browser should resolve the issue. We apologise for any inconvenience this might cause and thank you for your patience.


Issue 13, 2016

NMR detection in biofluid extracts at sub-μM concentrations via para-H2 induced hyperpolarization

Author affiliations

Abstract

NMR spectroscopy is one of the most powerful techniques to simultaneously obtain qualitative and quantitative information in chemical analysis. Despite its versatility, the applications of NMR in the study of biofluids are often limited by the insensitivity of the technique, further aggravated by the poor signal dispersion in the 1H spectra. Recent advances in para-H2 induced hyperpolarization have proven to address both these limitations for specific classes of compounds. Herein, this approach is for the first time applied for quantitative determination in biofluid extracts. We demonstrate that a combination of solid phase extraction, para-hydrogen induced hyperpolarization and selective NMR detection quickly reveals a doping substance, nikethamide, at sub-μM concentrations in urine. We suggest that this method can be further optimized for the detection of different analytes in various biofluids, anticipating a wider application of hyperpolarized NMR in metabolomics and pharmacokinetics studies in the near future.

Graphical abstract: NMR detection in biofluid extracts at sub-μM concentrations via para-H2 induced hyperpolarization

Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
06 Apr 2016
Accepted
11 May 2016
First published
11 May 2016

This article is Open Access

Analyst, 2016,141, 4001-4005
Article type
Communication

NMR detection in biofluid extracts at sub-μM concentrations via para-H2 induced hyperpolarization

I. Reile, N. Eshuis, N. K. J. Hermkens, B. J. A. van Weerdenburg, M. C. Feiters, F. P. J. T. Rutjes and M. Tessari, Analyst, 2016, 141, 4001 DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00804F

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported Licence. You can use material from this article in other publications, without requesting further permission from the RSC, provided that the correct acknowledgement is given and it is not used for commercial purposes.

To request permission to reproduce material from this article in a commercial publication, please go to the Copyright Clearance Center request page.

If you are an author contributing to an RSC publication, you do not need to request permission provided correct acknowledgement is given.

If you are the author of this article, you do not need to request permission to reproduce figures and diagrams provided correct acknowledgement is given. If you want to reproduce the whole article in a third-party commercial publication (excluding your thesis/dissertation for which permission is not required) please go to the Copyright Clearance Center request page.

Read more about how to correctly acknowledge RSC content.


Social activity

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements