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Issue 39, 2016
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Bacterial physiology is a key modulator of the antibacterial activity of graphene oxide

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Abstract

Carbon-based nanomaterials have a great potential as novel antibacterial agents; however, their interactions with bacteria are not fully understood. This study demonstrates that the antibacterial activity of graphene oxide (GO) depends on the physiological state of cells for both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. GO susceptibility of bacteria is the highest in the exponential growth phase, which are in growing physiology, and stationary-phase (non-growing) cells are quite resistant against GO. Importantly, the order of GO susceptibility of E. coli with respect to the growth phases (exponential ≫ decline > stationary) correlates well with the changes in the envelope ultrastructures of the cells. Our findings are not only fundamentally important but also particularly critical for practical antimicrobial applications of carbon-based nanomaterials.

Graphical abstract: Bacterial physiology is a key modulator of the antibacterial activity of graphene oxide

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
21 Jul 2016
Accepted
11 Aug 2016
First published
12 Aug 2016

Nanoscale, 2016,8, 17181-17189
Article type
Paper

Bacterial physiology is a key modulator of the antibacterial activity of graphene oxide

H. E. Karahan, L. Wei, K. Goh, Z. Liu, Ö. Birer, F. Dehghani, C. Xu, J. Wei and Y. Chen, Nanoscale, 2016, 8, 17181
DOI: 10.1039/C6NR05745D

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