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Issue 16, 2015
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The rheology of aqueous solutions of ethyl hydroxy-ethyl cellulose (EHEC) and its hydrophobically modified analogue (hmEHEC): extensional flow response in capillary break-up, jetting (ROJER) and in a cross-slot extensional rheometer

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Abstract

Cellulose derivatives containing associating hydrophobic groups along their hydrophilic backbone are used as rheology modifiers in the formulation of water-based spray paints, medicinal sprays, cosmetics and printable inks. Jetting and spraying applications of these materials involve progressive thinning and break-up of a fluid column or sheet into drops. Strong extensional kinematics develop in the thinning fluid neck. In viscous Newtonian fluids, inertial and viscous stresses oppose the surface tension-driven instability. In aqueous solutions of polymers such as Ethyl Hydroxy-Ethyl Cellulose (EHEC), chain elongation provides additional elastic stresses that can delay the capillary-driven pinch-off, influencing the sprayability or jettability of the complex fluid. In this study, we quantify the transient response of thinning filaments of cellulose ether solutions to extensional flows in a Capillary Break-up Extensional Rheometer (CaBER) and in a forced jet undergoing break-up using Rayleigh Ohnesorge Jetting Extensional Rheometry (ROJER). We also characterize the steady state molecular deformations using measurements of the flow-induced birefringence and excess pressure drop in an extensional stagnation point flow using a Cross-Slot Extensional Rheometer (CSER). We show that under the high extension rates encountered in jetting and spraying, the semi-dilute solutions of hydrophobically modified ethyl hydroxy-ethyl cellulose (hmEHEC) exhibit extensional thinning, while the unmodified bare chains of EHEC display an increase in extensional viscosity, up to a plateau value. For both EHEC and hmEHEC dispersions, the low extensibility of the cellulose derivatives limits the Trouton ratio observed at the highest extension rates attained (close to 105 s−1) to around 10–20. The reduction in extensional viscosity with increasing extension rate for the hydrophobically modified cellulose ether is primarily caused by the disruption of a transient elastic network that is initially formed by intermolecular association of hydrophobic stickers. This extensional thinning behavior, in conjunction with the low extensibility of the hydrophobically modified cellulose ether additives, makes these rheology modifiers ideal for controlling the extensional rheology in formulations that require jetting or spraying, with minimal residual stringiness or stranding.

Graphical abstract: The rheology of aqueous solutions of ethyl hydroxy-ethyl cellulose (EHEC) and its hydrophobically modified analogue (hmEHEC): extensional flow response in capillary break-up, jetting (ROJER) and in a cross-slot extensional rheometer

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
28 Jul 2014
Accepted
26 Jan 2015
First published
27 Jan 2015

This article is Open Access

Soft Matter, 2015,11, 3251-3270
Article type
Paper
Author version available

The rheology of aqueous solutions of ethyl hydroxy-ethyl cellulose (EHEC) and its hydrophobically modified analogue (hmEHEC): extensional flow response in capillary break-up, jetting (ROJER) and in a cross-slot extensional rheometer

V. Sharma, S. J. Haward, J. Serdy, B. Keshavarz, A. Soderlund, P. Threlfall-Holmes and G. H. McKinley, Soft Matter, 2015, 11, 3251
DOI: 10.1039/C4SM01661K

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